Meet the UcompOS Portal Proxy Components

If you’ve read my previous postings, you should now have a basic understanding of some of the core mechanics of the UcompOS Rich Productivity Framework including Proxy Components and Services Dictionaries.

The concept of the UcompOS Continuum should also be somewhat clearer now as well as the roles of the UcompOS Portal and the UcompOS SDK in the context of the UcompOS Continuum.

Despite the obvious significance of the UcompOS Portal, in the context of the UcompOS Continuum, it is just another entity with the UcompOS SDK implemented that publishes a Services Dictionary of public API methods exposed for other entities.

To take advantage of this fact, the UcompOS SDK has a host of Proxy Components built into it that can be thought of as client interfaces to the public API methods exposed by the UcompOS Portal.

Understanding the mechanics of building your own UcompOS public API methods and Proxy Components to those public API methods is the key to unleashing the true power of the UcompOS RPF and creating the most compelling rich experiences for users of your Rich Portal Application.

But even a basic exploration of the SDK’s built-in UcompOS Portal Proxy Components is a fun way to explore and learn.

In this post, I’ll introduce you briefly to the UcompOS Portal Proxy Components.  I won’t spend a lot of time detailing them as you’ll likely see some dedicated blog postings from me covering the individual Proxy Components and their nuances in the coming weeks.

Each Proxy Component covered is built into all 3 UcompOS SDKs – AIR, Flex/Flash, and JavaScript.

The implementation details of using the AIR and Flash/Flex (ActionScript 3.0) Proxy Components versus the JavaScript Proxy Components are very subtle and of course full SDK documentation is online for the ActionScript 3.0 SDK as well as the JavaScript SDK.

Since the SDK documentation is online, I won’t spend a lot of time covering the methods, properties, and events of the Proxy Components (as you can get all this information in the docs), rather I’ll just give a first-person synopsis of what you can do with each of the Proxy Components.

UcompOSAIRProxy

The UcompOSAIRProxy class allows you to create a virtual representation of a UcompOS AIR application in an entity.  Once you create this virtual representation, you then use this class’s launchApplication(); and quitApplication(); method to control the start and stop of the AIR application.  Then any communication with the AIR application is handled via the traditional means of Proxy Components and public API methods.  The UcompOSAIRProxy class would be used when you wanted to launch a UcompOS AIR application as a sub-application.  If the UcompOS AIR application was to be a base application, you would just have the network URL to the air package in the application manifest and the AIR application would be launchable from the UcompOS application dock.  See my tutorial entitled A Simple HTML Digital Camera Browser for an example of this.

UcompOSArtifactContainerProxy

The UcompOSArtifactContainerProxy class lets you create a container for UcompOS Artifacts on the UcompOS Portal.  A UcompOS Artifact is essentially a “widget” that can be an image or SWF application that can have functionality attached to it (drag and drop, double click, click, rollover, context menu, etc.).

A UcompOS Artifact Container then is a visual layout container for these artifacts.  I gave an example of this in my tutorial entitled Building a UcompOS Weather Channel Widget.

An example may be a taskbar.  Suppose I want to layout a number of widgets each with its own specific functionality attached to it along the bottom right corner of my UcompOS Portal interface.

To do this I could create a UcompOS Artifact Container via the UcompOSArtifactContainerProxy class.  Then when I create my UcompOS Artifact, I would pass a reference to my UcompOSArtifactContainerProxy instance and the artifact would be placed into the relevant container.

There are 3 layout options at present with the UcompOS Artifact Container: HBox, VBox, and Tile

These are parallel to the classes of the same name in the mx.containers package from the Flex 3 framework (FYI the UcompOS Portal is built on Flex 4).

UcompOSArtifactProxy

The UcompOSArtifactProxy is a class used to create UcompOS Artifacts on the UcompOS Portal.

A UcompOS Artifact can be thought of as a widget.  The widget can be purely presentational, or it can have functionality attached to it as my Weather Channel Widget example demonstrated.

The visual content of a UcompOS Artifact can articulated as one of three forms:

  1. The network URL to an image (PNG, GIF, JPG)
  2. The network URL to a SWF appication
  3. A ByteArray representation of an image

You then attach functionality to a UcompOS Artifact by calling the UcompOSArtifactProxy‘s many public methods and attaching various event listeners to it to handle click, double click, rollover, rollout, drag and drop, and other various events.

If the visual content of your artifact is a SWF, this SWF can be a UcompOS sub-application for even more exciting interactive possibilities.

At this point, HTML-type applications cannot be used as artifacts

As described above in my discussion of the UcompOSArtifactContainerProxy class, you can add a UcompOS Artifact to a container so that groups of similar artifacts can be arranged together in a logical presentation.

One cool thing you can do, if you don’t add an artifact to a container and just position it at specified coordinates on the UcompOS Portal, you can make it draggable.  And because you can configure artifacts to accept drops, the ability to drag and drop one artifact to another to create some desired behavior or functionality exists.

I’ll likely devote a tutorial to this interesting capability in the near future.

UcompOSBrowserWindowProxy

The UcompOSBrowserWindowProxy class lets you launch a satellite browser window from the UcompOS Portal.  You can add generic content to the browser window, or you can load a UcompOS sub-application.

The ability to communicate with a UcompOS sub-application loaded in a satellite browser window is the exact same as if the sub-application was loaded in the UcompOS Portal run-time, in a UcompOS Window, or in a UcompOS Artifact.

UcompOSDockProxy

The UcompOSDockProxy class lets you exert control over the UcompOS Portal’s Application Dock.

You can do things such as set context menus to the application icon an entity is associated with.  You can also change the size of the icons on the dock as well as control the “genie” effect (the effect where the dock icons expand and then contract as the mouse passes over them).

You can also hide the dock completely using the showDock(visible:Boolean):void; method.

And one of the more important capabilities is you can set an alert for the icon on the dock an entity is associated with using the setAlert(); method.  This would be useful perhaps in e-mail or instant messaging applications to alert the user of receipt of a new e-mail or instant message.

UcompOSGlobalManagerProxy

The UcompOSGlobalManagerProxy class provides an interface to a number of important visual and data features  of the UcompOS Portal.

For instance, if you wanted the UcompOS Portal to throw a generic Flex-style Alert, you could use the createAlert(); method.

If you wanted to dispatch an event to all entities in the UcompOS Continuum, you could use the dispatchContinuumEvent(); method.

Suppose you wanted to launch another UcompOS application from within an entity.  You could call the launchApplication(); method and pass the manifest URL of the target application’s application manifest.

These are only a few of the important duties the UcompOSGlobalManagerProxy facilitates.

UcompOSHTMLProxy

The UcompOS Portal is a Flex 4 application embedded in an HTML wrapper.

The UcompOSHTMLProxy class lets you call JavaScript functions in the HTML wrapper.

The class provides the alert();, confirm(); and prompt(); methods which invoke the JavaScript functionality of the same name.

You can then add event listeners such as UcompOSHTMLProxy.CONFIRM_SUBMIT and UcompOSHTMLProxy.PROMPT_SUBMIT to capture user-input.

You can also use the javascript(); method to pass pure JavaScript code.

So one possibility here, in the ucompos/local/LocalLib.js JavaScript file in the UcompOS Developers Package that you customize to create your own authentication, you can implement your own JavaScript methods that perform specific tasks and then access these methods from the UcompOSHTMLProxy.

UcompOSMenuBarProxy

The UcompOSMenuBarProxy lets you set the dataProvider for the UcompOS Menu Bar and your particular menu bar implementation comes into view when the UcompOS application associated with the entity that set the menu bar model comes into focus.

You can even associated a menu bar model with an individual UcompOS Window instance.

You then attach event listeners to capture user menu selections.

Two cool random quick points is that you can pass a baseMenu=true value to the second parameter of the setMenuBar(); method and it will remove the default UcompOS menu bar item so you can 100% customize the menu.  Also, in your dataProvider to the menu you can attach an icon property with the network URL of images you want to use for the individual menu bar nodes.

UcompOSStyleProxy

The UcompOSStyleProxy class lets you take control over the portal’s visual presentation including the background image (wallpaper) that appears on the UcompOS portal.

With the setTheme(); method, you can set the MDI window theme to one of 3 different pre-existing window themes.  Right now, I just have the 3 that come packaged with the flexlib.mdi package implemented (Windows XP, Mac OS 9, and the default style) but it is my intention to expand this.

There is also a setEffects(); method that let you control the visual effects that occur when UcompOS Windows are closed or minimized/maximized.  The options are Default, Linear, and Vista which are the effects built into the flexlib.mdi package.

There is also a generic setStyle(); method that lets you set a generic CSS style property to the UcompOS Portal.

One important point about this method.  When you call setStyle();, the UcompOS Portal dispatches a UcompOS Continuum Event – meaning that all entities get notified about the style change.

So if you did something like this:

UcompOSStyleProxy.getInstance().setStyle("Button","color",0xFF0000);

Every entity would be notified that the Button selector’s color property was just given a red value on the UcompOS Portal.

You could then listen for this UcompOSStyleProxy.STYLE_CHANGE event and change the visual presentation of an entity’s internal controls accordingly.

UcompOSWindowProxy

The UcompOSWindowProxy class is used to create MDI window instances on the UcompOS Portal and then load generic web content or a UcompOS sub-application into them.

The class documentation is definitely worth a look as there are a lot of really cool features you can employ with UcompOS Window instances.

So that’s it.  A brief look at all the UcompOS Portal Proxy Components built into the UcompOS SDK.

I invite you to view the source code of the the JavaScript SDK and you can check the UcompOS Flash/Flex SDK written in ActionScript 3 out of the UcompOS SVN Repository.  Viewing this code will give you some better ideas of how to construct Proxy Components.

I have not yet made the source code of the UcompOS Portal publicly viewable and do not have a timeline for doing so but if you have questions about how I have built the public API methods on the UcompOS Portal, please bring questions to me in the UcompOS Forum and I’ll share relevant strategies and code examples.

About Edward Mansouri
Edward Mansouri is the CEO and Founder of Ucompass.com, Inc., a company focused on building scalable and profitable e-Learning enterprises. His expertise is in building e-Learning software, as well as in building visual frameworks such as the Enrich Content Enrichment System and the newly announced UcompOS Rich Experience Framework. He has been working with Flash since 1998, building Flash applications since 2002, and working with Adobe AIR since its private alpha release in 2006. He authored the site AIRApps.net (later renamed to O2Apps.com) dedicated to providing leadership in building Adobe AIR applications. In 2010, he is building and releasing a new e-Learning platform called Educator 2 which is built entirely upon the UcompOS Rich Experience Framework. Since 1999, over 1,000,000 students have taken courses served with his original e-Learning platform, Educator 1.

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