Instantiating UcompOS Global (Continuum) Variables at Startup

In my post about UcompOS Shared Objects, I described how the UcompOS Portal furnishes a Shared Object Implementation that can be written to and read by any UcompOS entity in the UcompOS Continuum.

In a large-scale UcompOS Rich Portal Application, you very likely may find a need to share complex data across multiple UcompOS entities.

One effective approach to this challenge is to use the UcompOSGlobalManagerProxy class’s setSharedObject(), getSharedObject(), and getSharedObjects() methods.

These methods get/set shared objects on the UcompOS Portal at run-time.

But what if you want to populate the UcompOS Portal’s shared Object at start-up even before any UcompOS applications are launched?

As of the version 0.4.1 Milestone release of UcompOS RPF, there is a way to do this.

The key is a new <globalVariables/> element that can be added as a child element to the root <applications/> element in a dock manifest and as a child element to the root <application/> element in a UcompOS application manifest.

Below is a simple example of this in action in the dock manifest of my Educator 2 software application being built entirely on top of the UcompOS RPF:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<applications>
	<globalVariables>
		<globalVariable>
			<key>_DOMAIN_</key>
			<value>applications.ucompass.com</value>
		</globalVariable>
		<globalVariable>
			<key>_PROTOCOL_</key>
			<value>http</value>
		</globalVariable>
		<globalVariable>
			<key>_GATEWAY_</key>
			<value>http://pilotfish2.ucompass.com/apps/gateway</value>
		</globalVariable>
	</globalVariables>
	<application background="true" default="true">
		_PROTOCOL_://_DOMAIN_/Educator2PortalFoundation/manifest.xml
	</application>
</applications>

Each global variable is wrapped in a <globalVariable/> element with child <key/> and <value/> elements.

All global variables in the dock manifest will automatically be added to the UcompOS Portal’s Shared Object implementation and will immediately be available to all UcompOS entities.

String Substitutions in Manifest Files

In the above example, notice I am instantiating global variable named _PROTOCOL and _DOMAIN_. And then notice that those strings appear in my <application/> element.

A string substitution will automatically take place here such that the <application/> value will be http://applications.ucompass.com/Educator2PortalFoundation/manifest.xml after the substitution.

As mentioned earlier, the <globalVariables> element is supported in both application manifests and dock manifests so you can also establish global variables in this fashion when launching a UcompOS application.

Typing Shared Objects

The <value/> element supports an optional type attribute such that you can articulate the data type of a Shared Object.

The best way to show how this is accomplished is with examples:

Array

<globalVariable>
	<key>groceryList</key>
	<value type="Array">
		<item>Bananas</item>
		<item>Cereal</item>
		<item>Diapers</item>
	</value>
</globalVariable>

Object

<globalVariable>
	<key>contacts</key>
	<value type="Object">
		<item>
			<key>Joe</key>
			<value>555-1212</value>
		</item>
		<item>
			<key>Bob</key>
			<value>555-2121</value>
		</item>
	</value>
</globalVariable>

The type attribute can also be of type uint, int, Boolean, Number and String. The default data type is String. Also, the <item/> element supports the type attribute for Arrays and Objects.

Also, nesting of complex data structures is supported, so you can implement an Array of Arrays, or an Array of Objects, etc.

New Proxy Component in UcompOS SDK: UcompOSAlertProxy

This morning, I have just added a new Proxy Component to the UcompOS SDK: UcompOSAlertProxy that is available in version 0.2.2 and later of the UcompOS Developers Package.

UcompOSAlertProxy provides a way to create a modal dialogue on the UcompOS Portal via an implementation of the Flex Alert control.

Previously, I had made this possible with the createAlert(); method of the SDK class UcompOSGlobalManagerProxy.

The inefficiency with this is that UcompOSGlobalManagerProxy is a Singleton class (along with UcompOSDockProxy, UcompOSMenuBarProxy, and UcompOSStyleProxy).  So one instance of UcompOSGlobalManagerProxy would handle the event dispatching for all Alert dialogues created with its createAlert(); method.

So handling events dispatched by Alerts created with UcompOSGlobalManagerProxy‘s createAlert(); method required extra handling and actually provided risks of gaps in data integrity and continuity.

I have removed the createAlert(); from UcompOSGlobalManagerProxy and replaced the functionality with the simpleAlert(); and confirmAlert(); methods of the UcompOSAlertProxy class.

The simpleAlert(); method launches a simple Alert with a single control button that will default with a label of “OK”.

The signature of simpleAlert(); is as follows:

public function simpleAlert(title:String, message:String, okLabel:String="OK"):void

You have the ability to customize the label on the single button presented on the Alert control.

The signature of confirm(); is as follows:

public function confirm(title:String, message:String, okLabel:String = null,
cancelLabel:String = null, defaultButton:String="OK"):void

You can specify the labels to be used on both the OK and Cancal buttons and you can articulate which should be the default button.

When the user takes action and clicks a button on the Alert dialogue, an instance of SDKEvent is dispatched by the UcompOSAlertProxy instance of type UcompOSAlertProxy.ALERT_SUBMIT.

The SDKEvent instance’s data property will have a detail property of type String which will have a value of UcompOSAlertProxy.OK or UcompOSAlertProxy.CANCEL.

Let’s look at a very simple example with the aid of some code:

private function fileExists(file:String):void
{
 var a:UcompOSAlertProxy = new UcompOSAlertProxy();
 a.data = file;
 a.addEventListener(UcompOSAlertProxy.ALERT_SUBMIT,fileExists_handler);
 a.confirm("A file named "+file+" exists in the target location. 
 Do you wish to overwrite it?","Yes","No",UcompOSAlertProxy.CANCEL);
}
 
private function fileExists_handler(event:SDKEvent):void
{
 var a:UcompOSAlertProxy = event.proxyComponent as UcompOSAlertProxy;
 if(event.data.detail==UcompOSAlertProxy.OK)
 {
 trace("Overwrite file "+a.data);
 }
 
}

Building Full Screen Mode UcompOS Implementations

Since the release of Adobe Flash Player 9 in 2006, the Flash Player is capable of entering into what is known as “Full Screen Mode“.

In Full Screen Mode, the content playing in the Flash Player takes over the entire viewport of the display device such that the only content in view and capable of being interacted with is the content currently being executed in the Flash Player.

Depending on the nature of your application, this can in some circumstances create a much more focused and positive experience for your users.

The UcompOS Portal is configured to operate in Full Screen Mode and the UcompOS SDK provides a means for sending the UcompOS Portal into Full Screen Mode from one of your UcompOS applications or sub-applications.

Of course there are some rules and principles to observe when leveraging the power of Full Screen Mode in your UcompOS Applications.

In my blog posting on the Mechanics of UcompOS Desktop (AIR 2.0) Applications, we learned that the launching of an AIR application by the Flash Player must be preceded by a user-triggered mouse event.

The same rule applies to entering into Full Screen Mode.

The UcompOSGlobalManagerProxy class has two pertinent methods:  enterFullScreenMode(); and exitFullScreenMode();.

Both of these methods accept an optional single input parameter, message, of type String.

When you call either of these methods from one of your UcompOS applications or sub-applications, in order to generate the compulsory user mouse click, the UcompOS Portal throws up an Alert dialogue asking the user if they want to allow the request to go into or out of full screen mode.

Of course having the dialogue appear for exitFullScreenMode(); calls is somewhat dubious as all the user needs to do is hit the Escape key on their computer to break out of Full Screen Mode but for continuity, I have decided to keep the mechanics of throwing the Alert in calls to both enterFullScreenMode(); and exitFullScreenMode();.

The optional message parameter lets you customize the text that is presented on the Alert dialogue.

When the UcompOS Portal breaks into or out of Full Screen Mode, a Continuum Event (an instance of the SDKEvent class) of type UcompOSGlobalManagerProxy.SCREEN_MODE_CHANGE is broadcast.

The data Object of the event will have a state property with a literal string value of “normal” or “fullScreen” so that your applications and sub-applications can behave accordingly when the user enters/exits Full Screen Mode.

In the scenario we discussed in my AIR 2.0 UcompOS Applications posting mentioned above, we saw we can leverage the UcompOSArtifactProxy class to create a clickable UcompOS Artifact that immediately launches a particular AIR application (with the aid of the UcompOSAIRProxy class).

This same concept is also available with Full Screen Mode implementations.  You can create a UcompOS Artifact and assign its data Object special properties that tell the UcompOS Portal to launch or exit Full Screen Mode when the artifact is clicked on.

The property names will be enterFullScreenMode and exitFullScreenMode and both should be of type Boolean with a value of  true.

They should be mutually exclusive and you should not have the enterFullScreenMode and exitFullScreenMode properties set on the artifact’s data Object simultaneously.  If you do, the exitFullScreenMode property takes precedent.

Let’s look at a simple code-driven example:

private var artifact:UcompOSArtifactProxy;
 
private function start():void
{
 
 SDKClient.getInstance(this);
 UcompOSGlobalManagerProxy.getInstance().addEventListener
(UcompOSGlobalManagerProxy.SCREEN_MODE_CHANGE,screenModeChangeHandler);
 artifact = new UcompOSArtifactProxy();
 artifact.add(null,null,"http://www.server.com/enterFullScreenModeImage.png");
 artifact.data = {enterFullScreenMode:true};
 
}
 
private function screenModeChangeHandler(event:SDKEvent):void
{
 
 switch(event.data.state)
 {
 
 case "fullScreen":
 artifact.data = {exitFullScreenMode:true};
 artifact.setImage(null,"http://www.server.com/exitFullScreenModeImage.png");
 break;
 case "normal":
 artifact.data = {enterFullScreenMode:true};
 artifact.setImage(null,"http://www.server.com/enterFullScreenModeImage.png");
 
 }
 
}

An important point to make about Full Screen Mode implementations, at this time, UcompOS HTML content cannot be displayed while in full-screen mode.  UcompOS HTML applications and sub-applications rely on an iframe implementation which is outside the visual scope of the Flash Player.

UcompOS HTML entities can still be interacted with via Proxy Components while in Full Screen Mode however.

The same applies to UcompOS AIR 2.0 content.  It cannot be in view while the in Full Screen Mode but it can be interacted with by Proxy Component-driven interactions.

A Simple UcompOS Shared Object Impementation Example

The new Shared Object implementation in the UcompOS Rich Productivity Framework provides an additional model for achieving inter-application and sub-application communication and data exchange in a manner that is grounded in the MVC (Model-View-Controller) Design Pattern.

The term Shared Object in the context of the UcompOS RPF is similar in principle to the concept of the Local Shared Object infrastructure that has been in the Flash Player since the days of Flash 4 but in our case, the UcompOS RPF Shared Object is a run-time Object that does not get saved locally (unless you of course configure your own implementation to do so).

In the UcompOS Portal is an Object that gets instantiated into the application’s run-time memory upon authentication.

This Object is then freely available for all UcompOS entities to access using the GlobalManager.setSharedObject, GlobalManager.getSharedObject, and GlobalManager.getSharedObjects public API methods sponsored by the UcompOS Portal.

The UcompOSGlobalManagerProxy class in the UcompOS SDK has an API to these methods in the public methods of the class as indicated  below:

public function setSharedObject(key:String, value:Object):void
public function getSharedObject(key:String):void
public function getSharedObjects(keys:Array):void

One of the more important aspects of the Shared Object implementation is that the UcompOS Portal dispatches a Continuum Event of type SDKEvent.SHARED_OBJECT whenever a property of the Shared Object changes.

A Continuum Event is an event dispatched to every entity in the UcompOS Continuum.

An entity can attach a listener to the UcompOSGlobalManagerProxy Singleton listening for SDKEvent.SHARED_OBJECT events.

The event Object will have a key and a value property representing the property on the Shared Object that was just modified and its associated value.

As a very simple example of what we can do with this, I set up a basic UcompOS implementation.

The implementation involves a UcompOS background application that launches a UcompOS Window with a text area.  Upon initialization, this application launches another UcompOS Window with a sub-application in it next to the initial window  This sub-application also has a text area.

When text is entered in the primary application window’s text area, the text is instantly displayed in the sub-application window’s text area.

The mechanics for this employ the UcompOS Shared Object.

I’ll share the code below so you can get an understanding of how it was configured:

The Dock Manifest

<applications>
 <application background="true">
  http://desktop.ucompass.com/Shared_Object/manifest.xml
 </application>
</applications>

The Application Manifest

<application selfLoading="true" width="500" height="500" x="0" y="100">
 <source>
 <base>http://desktop.ucompass.com/Shared_Object/windowA.html</base>
 </source>
 <titles>
 <title locale="en_US">Shared Object Example</title>
 </titles>
</application>

The Application Code

<html>
<head>
<title>Window A</title>
<script type="text/javascript" src="/UcompOSSDK.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">
 
 var g;
 var w;
 
 function start()
 {
  g = new UcompOSGlobalManagerProxy();
  w = new UcompOSWindowProxy();
  w.add("http://desktop.ucompass.com/Shared_Object/windowB.html","Echo",500,500,510,100);
 }
 
 function echo()
 {
  // pause for 1/100th of a second as the onkeypress event is dispatched before the textarea is updated
  setTimeout(function() { g.setSharedObject("echo",document.getElementById('text').value); },10);
 }
 
</script>
</head>
<body>
<u>Enter some text</u><br/>
<textarea id="text" style="width: 400px; height: 400px;" onkeypress="echo();"></textarea>
</body>
</html>

The Sub-Application Code

 
<html>
<head>
<title>Window B</title>
<script type="text/javascript" src="/UcompOSSDK.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">
 
 var g;
 var w;
 
 function start()
 {
  g = new UcompOSGlobalManagerProxy();
  g.addEventListener(g.SHARED_OBJECT,echo);
 }
 
 function echo(data)
 {
  switch(data.key)
  {
   case "echo":
    document.getElementById('text').value = data.value;
   break;
  }
 }
 
</script>
</head>
<body>
<u>What you're saying in the other window</u><br/>
<textarea id="text" style="width: 400px; height: 400px;"></textarea>
</body>
</html>

Shared Object Model Implemented into UcompOS RPF

As of the UcompOS RPF Public Alpha Release 0.1.13 that I posted last night, there is a new Shared Object implementation model.

On the UcompOS Portal, there is a run-time Object that can be used to share information across multiple entities in a UcompOS implementation.

Note that at this time this is just a run-time Object.  This is NOT an implementation of the Local Shared Object that gets permanently housed in the Flash Player’s local storage infrastructure.

The UcompOSGlobalManagerProxy has three new methods: setSharedObject();, getSharedObject();, and getSharedObjects();.

I’ll describe each of them below:

public function setSharedObject(key:String, value:Object):void

This sets a property named key on the UcompOS Portal shared object and assigns it a value of value.

A very important point is that when this method is called, the UcompOS Portal dispatches a UcompOS Continuum event of type UcompOSGlobalManagerProxy.SHARED_OBJECT with properties of key and value such that each entity in the Continuum is notified when a Shared Object value is updated.  This could easily enable two disparate UcompOS Applications to update their interfaces in real-time according to model changes implemented by the other.

public function getSharedObject(key:String):void

This retrieves the value on the UcompOS Portal shared object in the property key.

The information is received asynchronously by listening for an SDKEvent of type UcompOSGlobalManagerProxy.SHARED_OBJECT and testing the value of the event object’s key property.

public function getSharedObjects(keys:Array):void

This retrieves multiple shared objects simultaneously.  Each member of the keys array is the name of a property on the UcompOS Portal shared object.

The data is retrieved asynchronously by listening for an SDKEvent of type UcompOSGlobalManagerProxy.SHARED_OBJECTS whose data Object will have a sharedObjects property that is an Object.  Each property name requested in the keys array is a property name in the sharedObjects Object with its value the value of the corresponding item on the UcompOS Portal shared object.

Building a Multilingual UcompOS Implementation

The UcompOS Rich Productivity Framework is designed to make it easy to serve localized Rich Portal Application implementations.

In this tutorial, we are going to explore the localization capabilities of the UcompOS RPF and look at some strategies for leveraging these capabilities.

I have created a Video that I encourage you to view that shows the implementation we are going to build in this tutorial in action, and you should also Download the source code that we build in this application so you can better follow along with it.

As is the case with most of our UcompOS tutorials, we are going to focus much less on aesthetics and presentation and more on the highlighting of core UcompOS fundamentals and mechanics.

In addition to highlighting the localization capabilities of the UcompOS RPF, we are also going to touch on a number of other useful and important topics including some advanced capabilities of UcompOS Application Manifest files as well as working with the UcompOSStyleProxy class which manages the aesthetic presentation of the UcompOS Portal.

In addition, we are going to learn more about the UcompOS Menu Bar, and also about the concept of declaring default UcompOS Background Applications.

Our Target Implementation

The implementation we want to build will involve a UcompOS application that opens some simple content in a UcompOS Window.  The content will internally be configured to display some simple text that can be automatically translated on the fly to another language using Yahoo’s BabelFish free translation API.

We will set up the application such that the user can switch the operating language using a “language chooser” we’ll build into the UcompOS Menu Bar.

We will also create graphical artifacts that provide a customized experience to the end user when they switch between languages.

The languages we’ll allow users to choose from will be:

  • English
  • Spanish
  • German
  • French
  • Italian

Two UcompOS Applications Involved

Our implementation will involve the construction of two UcompOS Applications.  One we will consider the Controller for our implementation, and another we will consider the View.

Both our applications will be UcompOS HTML applications that will leverage the UcompOS JavaScript SDK.

We are going to put all assets and code related to our implementation in a single folder named Multilingual.  Inside the Multilingual folder are controller and view subfolders with the pertinent assets and code in each folder.

Implementation Specifics

Let’s talk a little bit more about exactly how we want our implementation to behave.

We want to place a language chooser on the UcompOS Menu Bar that lets the user switch between languages.

We want this Menu Bar to be perpetually on the UcompOS Menu Bar even when our View application is in focus.

Our Dock Manifest

Let’s take a look at our Dock Manifest and discuss some of its more important aspects:

<applications>
<application background="true" default="true">

http://desktop.ucompass.com/Multilingual/controller/manifest.xml

</application>
<application>

http://desktop.ucompass.com/Multilingual/view/manifest.xml

</application>
</applications>

Obviously, the first UcompOS Application listed in our Dock Manifest is our Controller application and the second is our View application.

A very important point to discuss are the two attributes set for our Controller application, specifically background=”true” and default=”true”.

When you declare a UcompOS Application as a background application, that means it is to be launched immediately upon authentication to the UcompOS Portal and it is to not be presented on the UcompOS Application Dock.

The code is simply loaded in the UcompOS run-time immediately and remains available for interaction throughout the session.

Setting an application as the default has implications on the UcompOS Menu Bar – the Menu Bar of the application declared as the default application is the Menu Bar that shows when no application is in focus.

The best analogy to this is to consider the Finder application in Mac OS X.  The Finder’s Menu Bar shows up in Mac OS X when no other application is open.  Also, if you click the Mac OS X desktop on the wallpaper (not on an artifact from a running application), the Menu Bar of the Finder is what is displayed.

This is paralleled in the UcompOS RPF by designating an application with the default=”true” attribute in the Dock Manifest.

If no application is configured with the default=”true” attribute, then the base, default UcompOS Menu Bar is displayed when no application is in focus.

Also, if you try to configure a Dock Manifest with more than one application specified as the default, you’ll encounter a run-time error from the UcompOS Portal.

Also, in an individual application’s Application Manifest, you can instruct the UcompOS Portal to use the default Menu Bar.  We’ll look at this shortly as this will be how we configure our View application.

The Controller Application Manifest

Let’s take a look at the Application Manifest for our Controller:

<application>

 <source>
 <base>http://desktop.ucompass.com/Multilingual/controller/Controller.html</base>
 </source>

 <menu>
 <menuitem label="Language">
 <menuitem label="English" icon="http://desktop.ucompass.com/Multilingual/view/images/icons/en_US_menubar.png" data="en_US"/>
 <menuitem label="Spanish" icon="http://desktop.ucompass.com/Multilingual/view/images/icons/es_ES_menubar.png" data="es_ES"/>
 <menuitem label="German" icon="http://desktop.ucompass.com/Multilingual/view/images/icons/de_DE_menubar.png" data="de_DE"/>
 <menuitem label="French" icon="http://desktop.ucompass.com/Multilingual/view/images/icons/fr_FR_menubar.png" data="fr_FR"/>
 <menuitem label="Italian" icon="http://desktop.ucompass.com/Multilingual/view/images/icons/it_IT_menubar.png" data="it_IT"/>
 </menuitem>
 </menu>

</application>

As you can see our Controller Application Manifest is very simple but its chief critical responsibility is to furnish a Menu Bar implementation for the UcompOS Portal.

Since our Controller Application is configured as the default application in our Dock Manifest, its Menu Bar will be what displays when no other application is in focus.

The XML structure for the Menu Bar is very simple and straightforward.  Notice the icon property points to the network URL of an icon image to be displayed on the Menu Bar.  Also, a data property must be present in a Menu Bar node for an event to be dispatched to the applications and sub-applications the Menu Bar is associated with when the user chooses a Menu Bar option on the UcompOS Portal.

Our Menu Bar configures a Language Chooser on the UcompOS Menu Bar and lets the end-user choose between one of five different languages.

The View Application Manifest

Now let’s take a look at the View application’s Application Manifest:

<application selfLoading="true" width="500" height="500" x="100" y="100">

 <source>
 <base>http://desktop.ucompass.com/Multilingual/view/View.html</base>
 </source>

 <titles>
 <title locale="en_US">A Multilingual Application</title>
 <title locale="es_ES">Un uso multilingue</title>
 <title locale="de_DE">Eine mehrsprachige Anwendung</title>
 <title locale="fr_FR">Une application multilingue</title>
 <title locale="it_IT">Un'applicazione multilingue</title>
 </titles>

 <icons>
 <icon locale="en_US">http://desktop.ucompass.com/Multilingual/view/images/icons/en_US_dock.png</icon>
 <icon locale="es_ES">http://desktop.ucompass.com/Multilingual/view/images/icons/es_ES_dock.png</icon>
 <icon locale="de_DE">http://desktop.ucompass.com/Multilingual/view/images/icons/de_DE_dock.png</icon>
 <icon locale="fr_FR">http://desktop.ucompass.com/Multilingual/view/images/icons/fr_FR_dock.png</icon>
 <icon locale="it_IT">http://desktop.ucompass.com/Multilingual/view/images/icons/it_IT_dock.png</icon>
 </icons>

 <toolTips>
 <toolTip locale="en_US">See a UcompOS Application translate text into English</toolTip>
 <toolTip locale="es_ES">Vea un uso de UcompOS traducir el texto a inglés</toolTip>
 <toolTip locale="de_DE">Sehen Sie eine UcompOS Anwendung, Text ins Englische zu übersetzen</toolTip>
 <toolTip locale="fr_FR">Voir l'application d'UcompOS traduire le texte en anglais</toolTip>
 <toolTip locale="it_IT">Vedi un'applicazione di UcompOS tradurre il testo in inglese</toolTip>
 </toolTips>

 <menu default="true"/>

</application>

The first thing to notice about the Application Manifest above is the strategy employed for localizing Application titles, icons, and tool tips.

The Application Title shows up on the UcompOS Application Dock for a particular application as well as any UcompOS Windows that are spawned by the application.  The same applies to Application Icons.

Tool tips show up when the user mouses over an application icon on the UcompOS Application Dock and the mouse hovers for a second.

Notice how the locale attributes in this manifest match up to the data attributes for the menu bar model in our Controller manifest.

Another important thing to take note of is the <menu default=”true”/> element in the manifest.

This tells the UcompOS Portal that when this application is in focus, still use the UcompOS Portal’s default Menu Bar which will be the Menu Bar of our Controller Application.

Also, note the selfLoading=”true” attribute as well as the width, height, x, and y attributes in our manifest’s root <application/> element.

This tells the UcompOS Portal to launch the application into a UcompOS Window instance versus simply loading it into the UcompOS run-time.

Preparing the Graphics

The next task in building our implementation will be to prepare the graphic assets we’ll use.

In this implementation, I want our application icon to automatically update on the UcompOS Dock and UcompOS Window instances spawned by our application to reflect the most recently selected language.  So I’ll need five different application dock icons – one for each language.

Then on the UcompOS Menu Bar, we will add a “language chooser” utility.  I want each node in the language chooser, which will represent a different language, to have an icon representative of the given language.  So I’ll need five different menu bar icons – one for each language.

Finally, each time a new language is selected, I want the background wallpaper for my UcompOS Portal implementation to display an image representative of the chosen language.

I have created a folder named images in my Multilingual project’s view folder and in the images folder I’ve created two more folders:  icons and backgrounds.  I am placing the dock and menu bar icons in the icons folder and the background images in the backgrounds folder.

The Controller Source Code

As you can see in our Controller‘s Application Manifest, it points to the following network URL as the location for the application’s source code:

http://desktop.ucompass.com/Multilingual/controller/Controller.html

Let’s take a look at this application’s source code below and discuss it:

<html>
<head>
<title>Multilingual Controller</title>

<script type="text/javascript" src="/UcompOSSDK.js"></script>

<script type="text/javascript">

 var m;
 var g;
 var s;

 function start()
 {
 m = new UcompOSMenuBarProxy();
 g = new UcompOSGlobalManagerProxy();
 s = new UcompOSStyleProxy();

 m.addEventListener(m.CHANGE,menuChangeHandler);
 }

 function menuChangeHandler(menuData)
 {
 g.changeLanguage(menuData.data);
 s.setBackgroundImage("http://desktop.ucompass.com/Multilingual/view/images/backgrounds/"+menuData.data+".jpg");
 }

</script>

</head>
</html>

The first thing to notice is since this is an HTML application, we have the UcompOS JavaScript SDK installed.

Our start(); method employs a class we haven’t looked at yet in any of our tutorials, UcompOSMenuBarProxy, which manages and handles events dispatched by the Menu Bar on the UcompOS Portal.

In this case, we are added an event handler to handle CHANGE events.

In addition to the UcompOSMenuBarProxy, we are also working with the UcompOSGlobalManagerProxy and UcompOSStyleProxy classes in this application.

In this application, when we receive notification that the user has selected a new option on the Menu Bar, we access the newly selected language as the data property of the menuData Object passed to the event handler by the UcompOS SDK.

We then take that value and pass it to the changeLanguage(); method of the UcompOSGlobalManagerProxy.  This method configures the operating language on the UcompOS Portal with the newly chosen language string.  Whenever the UcompOS Portal’s operating language changes, a UcompOS Continuum Event is dispatched meaning that every running application and sub-application in the UcompOS Continuum is notified instantly.  This detail will be important to us when we look at our View application.

We also call the setBackgroundImage(); of the UcompOSStyleProxy and pass it the URL of a background image that is representative of the newly selected language.  This method sets the wallpaper image for the UcompOS Portal.

The View Source Code

As we saw in our View application’s Application Manifest, the source code of our View application is reachable at a network URL of:

http://desktop.ucompass.com/Multilingual/view/View.html

In the View application, we are starting with a string of text embedded in an HTML DIV element that is in the English language.

In our start(); method, we are creating an instance of the UcompOSGlobalManagerProxy class and calling its getSessionInfo(); method.  We are also attaching an event listener for events of type UcompOSGlobalManagerProxy.SESSION_INFO.

The getSessionInfo(); method the UcompOS Global Manager Proxy is extremely important.  It returns an Object with a number of important properties including the unique user Id that the current user is authenticated into the UcompOS Portal with.

Also, it returns the current language the UcompOS Portal is operating in in a property called language.

The exact implementation details regarding doing the actual language translation are outside the scope of the UcompOS RPF but I’ll explain them briefly.

We are using a web-based service called Enrich which provides an API to the Yahoo BabelFish free online language translation service to convert our content from one language to another.

One other UcompOS-related detail in our implementation is we are creating a UcompOSWindowProxy instance and setting its self property to true.

This lets us access the methods and properties of the UcompOS Window that the application we are operating in has been loaded into.

Once the user changes to a new language, we are then calling the UcompOSWindowProxy‘s setTitle(); method to update the title on the UcompOS Window in real-time.

Let’s take a look at the full source code of our View application below:

<html>
<head
<title>Multilngual Application</title>

<style type="text/css">

 body
 {
 font-family: Helvetica, Arial;
 font-size: 12px;
 }

 #title
 {
 font-size: 24px;
 background-color: #2677B6;
 color: #FFFFFF;
 font-weight: bold;
 text-align: center;
 padding: 2px;
 }

</style>

<script type="text/javascript" src="http://pilotfish.ucompass.com/gofish"></script>
<script type="text/javascript" src="/UcompOSSDK.js"></script>

<script type="text/javascript">

 var currentLanguage = 'en_US';
 var g;
 var thisWindow;
 var languageReference = {en_US:'English',es_ES:'Spanish',fr_FR:'French',de_DE:'German',it_IT:'Italian'};

 function start()
 {
 thisWindow = new UcompOSWindowProxy();
 thisWindow.self = true;
 g = new UcompOSGlobalManagerProxy();
 g.addEventListener(g.LANGUAGE_CHANGE,changeLanguage);
 g.addEventListener(g.SESSION_INFO,init);
 g.getSessionInfo();
 }

 function init(sdkData)
 {
 var c = setInterval(function () { if(callWebService) { clearInterval(c); changeLanguage(sdkData); } },100);
 }

 function changeLanguage(sdkData)
 {
 var query = new Object();
 query['feature'] = 'Search';
 query['module'] = 'Translate';
 query['sourceLanguage'] = currentLanguage;
 query['targetLanguage'] = sdkData.language;
 query['selectedText'] = document.getElementById('content').innerHTML;
 query['handler'] = 'changeLanguage_handler';
 callWebService(query);
 currentLanguage = sdkData.language;
 }

 function changeLanguage_handler(xmlObject)
 {
 document.getElementById('content').style.visibility = 'visible';
 document.getElementById('content').innerHTML = getTextNode(getXPath(xmlObject,"//translation")[0]);
 document.getElementById('title').innerHTML = languageReference[currentLanguage];
 thisWindow.setTitle(languageReference[currentLanguage]+" Window Title");
 }

</script>

</head>

<div id="title"></div>

<p/>

<div id="content" style="visibility: hidden;">
 As the name implies, an air mass is a mass of air that has
 relatively uniform characteristics with respect to temperature,
 and moisture. Air masses are often characterized by both their
 temperatures and their humidities. Air masses can basically be
 classified as warm or cold with respect to temperature and moist
 or dry with respect to humidity. The characteristics of an air
 mass are determined by the region over which it formed. For
 instance, during the winter, when the nights are long and frigid
 over the Polar regions, the air tends to become relatively
 uniform. A very cold and dry air mass develops. Occasionally,
 pieces of these air masses will break free and be transported by
 the jet stream.
</div>

<body>
</body>
</html>

Big Picture Conclusions

By isolating the language chooser into its own application, we are able to take advantage of the concept of UcompOS Continuum Events.  In our implementation, when the user changes their operating language, the UcompOSGlobalManagerProxy‘s changeLanguage(); method is invoked, which causes a UcompOS Continuum Event to be dispatched.

Therefore, we could have an unlimited number of UcompOS applications or sub-applications running, all of which employed their own custom logic and behavior when encountering a single language change event that originated in our Controller application.

Screen Capture

Below is a look at our implementation in operation:

Demo

Meet the UcompOS Portal Proxy Components

If you’ve read my previous postings, you should now have a basic understanding of some of the core mechanics of the UcompOS Rich Productivity Framework including Proxy Components and Services Dictionaries.

The concept of the UcompOS Continuum should also be somewhat clearer now as well as the roles of the UcompOS Portal and the UcompOS SDK in the context of the UcompOS Continuum.

Despite the obvious significance of the UcompOS Portal, in the context of the UcompOS Continuum, it is just another entity with the UcompOS SDK implemented that publishes a Services Dictionary of public API methods exposed for other entities.

To take advantage of this fact, the UcompOS SDK has a host of Proxy Components built into it that can be thought of as client interfaces to the public API methods exposed by the UcompOS Portal.

Understanding the mechanics of building your own UcompOS public API methods and Proxy Components to those public API methods is the key to unleashing the true power of the UcompOS RPF and creating the most compelling rich experiences for users of your Rich Portal Application.

But even a basic exploration of the SDK’s built-in UcompOS Portal Proxy Components is a fun way to explore and learn.

In this post, I’ll introduce you briefly to the UcompOS Portal Proxy Components.  I won’t spend a lot of time detailing them as you’ll likely see some dedicated blog postings from me covering the individual Proxy Components and their nuances in the coming weeks.

Each Proxy Component covered is built into all 3 UcompOS SDKs – AIR, Flex/Flash, and JavaScript.

The implementation details of using the AIR and Flash/Flex (ActionScript 3.0) Proxy Components versus the JavaScript Proxy Components are very subtle and of course full SDK documentation is online for the ActionScript 3.0 SDK as well as the JavaScript SDK.

Since the SDK documentation is online, I won’t spend a lot of time covering the methods, properties, and events of the Proxy Components (as you can get all this information in the docs), rather I’ll just give a first-person synopsis of what you can do with each of the Proxy Components.

UcompOSAIRProxy

The UcompOSAIRProxy class allows you to create a virtual representation of a UcompOS AIR application in an entity.  Once you create this virtual representation, you then use this class’s launchApplication(); and quitApplication(); method to control the start and stop of the AIR application.  Then any communication with the AIR application is handled via the traditional means of Proxy Components and public API methods.  The UcompOSAIRProxy class would be used when you wanted to launch a UcompOS AIR application as a sub-application.  If the UcompOS AIR application was to be a base application, you would just have the network URL to the air package in the application manifest and the AIR application would be launchable from the UcompOS application dock.  See my tutorial entitled A Simple HTML Digital Camera Browser for an example of this.

UcompOSArtifactContainerProxy

The UcompOSArtifactContainerProxy class lets you create a container for UcompOS Artifacts on the UcompOS Portal.  A UcompOS Artifact is essentially a “widget” that can be an image or SWF application that can have functionality attached to it (drag and drop, double click, click, rollover, context menu, etc.).

A UcompOS Artifact Container then is a visual layout container for these artifacts.  I gave an example of this in my tutorial entitled Building a UcompOS Weather Channel Widget.

An example may be a taskbar.  Suppose I want to layout a number of widgets each with its own specific functionality attached to it along the bottom right corner of my UcompOS Portal interface.

To do this I could create a UcompOS Artifact Container via the UcompOSArtifactContainerProxy class.  Then when I create my UcompOS Artifact, I would pass a reference to my UcompOSArtifactContainerProxy instance and the artifact would be placed into the relevant container.

There are 3 layout options at present with the UcompOS Artifact Container: HBox, VBox, and Tile

These are parallel to the classes of the same name in the mx.containers package from the Flex 3 framework (FYI the UcompOS Portal is built on Flex 4).

UcompOSArtifactProxy

The UcompOSArtifactProxy is a class used to create UcompOS Artifacts on the UcompOS Portal.

A UcompOS Artifact can be thought of as a widget.  The widget can be purely presentational, or it can have functionality attached to it as my Weather Channel Widget example demonstrated.

The visual content of a UcompOS Artifact can articulated as one of three forms:

  1. The network URL to an image (PNG, GIF, JPG)
  2. The network URL to a SWF appication
  3. A ByteArray representation of an image

You then attach functionality to a UcompOS Artifact by calling the UcompOSArtifactProxy‘s many public methods and attaching various event listeners to it to handle click, double click, rollover, rollout, drag and drop, and other various events.

If the visual content of your artifact is a SWF, this SWF can be a UcompOS sub-application for even more exciting interactive possibilities.

At this point, HTML-type applications cannot be used as artifacts

As described above in my discussion of the UcompOSArtifactContainerProxy class, you can add a UcompOS Artifact to a container so that groups of similar artifacts can be arranged together in a logical presentation.

One cool thing you can do, if you don’t add an artifact to a container and just position it at specified coordinates on the UcompOS Portal, you can make it draggable.  And because you can configure artifacts to accept drops, the ability to drag and drop one artifact to another to create some desired behavior or functionality exists.

I’ll likely devote a tutorial to this interesting capability in the near future.

UcompOSBrowserWindowProxy

The UcompOSBrowserWindowProxy class lets you launch a satellite browser window from the UcompOS Portal.  You can add generic content to the browser window, or you can load a UcompOS sub-application.

The ability to communicate with a UcompOS sub-application loaded in a satellite browser window is the exact same as if the sub-application was loaded in the UcompOS Portal run-time, in a UcompOS Window, or in a UcompOS Artifact.

UcompOSDockProxy

The UcompOSDockProxy class lets you exert control over the UcompOS Portal’s Application Dock.

You can do things such as set context menus to the application icon an entity is associated with.  You can also change the size of the icons on the dock as well as control the “genie” effect (the effect where the dock icons expand and then contract as the mouse passes over them).

You can also hide the dock completely using the showDock(visible:Boolean):void; method.

And one of the more important capabilities is you can set an alert for the icon on the dock an entity is associated with using the setAlert(); method.  This would be useful perhaps in e-mail or instant messaging applications to alert the user of receipt of a new e-mail or instant message.

UcompOSGlobalManagerProxy

The UcompOSGlobalManagerProxy class provides an interface to a number of important visual and data features  of the UcompOS Portal.

For instance, if you wanted the UcompOS Portal to throw a generic Flex-style Alert, you could use the createAlert(); method.

If you wanted to dispatch an event to all entities in the UcompOS Continuum, you could use the dispatchContinuumEvent(); method.

Suppose you wanted to launch another UcompOS application from within an entity.  You could call the launchApplication(); method and pass the manifest URL of the target application’s application manifest.

These are only a few of the important duties the UcompOSGlobalManagerProxy facilitates.

UcompOSHTMLProxy

The UcompOS Portal is a Flex 4 application embedded in an HTML wrapper.

The UcompOSHTMLProxy class lets you call JavaScript functions in the HTML wrapper.

The class provides the alert();, confirm(); and prompt(); methods which invoke the JavaScript functionality of the same name.

You can then add event listeners such as UcompOSHTMLProxy.CONFIRM_SUBMIT and UcompOSHTMLProxy.PROMPT_SUBMIT to capture user-input.

You can also use the javascript(); method to pass pure JavaScript code.

So one possibility here, in the ucompos/local/LocalLib.js JavaScript file in the UcompOS Developers Package that you customize to create your own authentication, you can implement your own JavaScript methods that perform specific tasks and then access these methods from the UcompOSHTMLProxy.

UcompOSMenuBarProxy

The UcompOSMenuBarProxy lets you set the dataProvider for the UcompOS Menu Bar and your particular menu bar implementation comes into view when the UcompOS application associated with the entity that set the menu bar model comes into focus.

You can even associated a menu bar model with an individual UcompOS Window instance.

You then attach event listeners to capture user menu selections.

Two cool random quick points is that you can pass a baseMenu=true value to the second parameter of the setMenuBar(); method and it will remove the default UcompOS menu bar item so you can 100% customize the menu.  Also, in your dataProvider to the menu you can attach an icon property with the network URL of images you want to use for the individual menu bar nodes.

UcompOSStyleProxy

The UcompOSStyleProxy class lets you take control over the portal’s visual presentation including the background image (wallpaper) that appears on the UcompOS portal.

With the setTheme(); method, you can set the MDI window theme to one of 3 different pre-existing window themes.  Right now, I just have the 3 that come packaged with the flexlib.mdi package implemented (Windows XP, Mac OS 9, and the default style) but it is my intention to expand this.

There is also a setEffects(); method that let you control the visual effects that occur when UcompOS Windows are closed or minimized/maximized.  The options are Default, Linear, and Vista which are the effects built into the flexlib.mdi package.

There is also a generic setStyle(); method that lets you set a generic CSS style property to the UcompOS Portal.

One important point about this method.  When you call setStyle();, the UcompOS Portal dispatches a UcompOS Continuum Event – meaning that all entities get notified about the style change.

So if you did something like this:

UcompOSStyleProxy.getInstance().setStyle("Button","color",0xFF0000);

Every entity would be notified that the Button selector’s color property was just given a red value on the UcompOS Portal.

You could then listen for this UcompOSStyleProxy.STYLE_CHANGE event and change the visual presentation of an entity’s internal controls accordingly.

UcompOSWindowProxy

The UcompOSWindowProxy class is used to create MDI window instances on the UcompOS Portal and then load generic web content or a UcompOS sub-application into them.

The class documentation is definitely worth a look as there are a lot of really cool features you can employ with UcompOS Window instances.

So that’s it.  A brief look at all the UcompOS Portal Proxy Components built into the UcompOS SDK.

I invite you to view the source code of the the JavaScript SDK and you can check the UcompOS Flash/Flex SDK written in ActionScript 3 out of the UcompOS SVN Repository.  Viewing this code will give you some better ideas of how to construct Proxy Components.

I have not yet made the source code of the UcompOS Portal publicly viewable and do not have a timeline for doing so but if you have questions about how I have built the public API methods on the UcompOS Portal, please bring questions to me in the UcompOS Forum and I’ll share relevant strategies and code examples.

A Simple HTML Digital Camera Browser

In this tutorial, we will look at a variety of core UcompOS Rich Productivity Framework concepts, and in particular we will explore the mechanics of adding a desktop component to your UcompOS Rich Portal Application.

It is recommended you download the source of the application we’ll build in this tutorial at the link below so you can follow along and there is also a video demonstration of the application we are going to build in this tutorial.

Download the Simple HTML Digital Camera Browser Source Code

This tutorial assumes you have at least a basic working knowledge of:

  • Adobe AIR 2.0
  • Adobe Flash Builder
  • ActionScript 3.0
  • HTML
  • JavaScript
  • You should have read my blog posts or watched my video tutorials about UcompOS Proxy Components and Services Dictionaries

The goals for our application are as follows:

We want to build a simple digital camera browser that lets the user browse through and view images from their digital camera in a Rich Portal Application implementation.

We are going to keep the application as deliberately simple as possible and we are not going to address its cosmetics or aesthetics so that we can focus on providing instruction on specific UcompOS concepts and principles.

To further define the specifications for our application, we want to build a UcompOS Application that prompts the user to connect their digital camera to their computer.  We want our application to be able to know when their digital camera has been connected.  Then when the digital camera has been connected, we want to display the contents of their camera to them.  The user should be able to easily browse through their camera’s contents and they should be able to click on a file on the camera to view it.  Also, the file should be opened in the native photo-viewing application on their computer versus simply displayed in the browser.

Again, we are going to focus on a very simple implementation and will not focus on aesthetics or presentation so that we can focus more on the core UcompOS mechanics we are leveraging to build our application.

Our UcompOS application is comprised of the following components:

  • An AIR 2.0 UcompOS Application built with Adobe Flash Builder 4
  • An HTML UcompOS Sub Application

We’ll walk through the process of setting up and building the different pieces of the application fairly linearly and then tie it all together at the end with a screenshot of our application.

Implementation Details

The way I want to design our program, I want a UcompOS Application to load on the UcompOS Application Dock entitled “My Camera”.  When this application is opened, we want it to launch our UcompOS AIR 2.0 application.  I want that application to prompt the user to connect their digital camera.

When the user connects their digital camera, I want to instantly launch a UcompOS Window instance in the UcompOS Portal that displays the contents of the camera to the end user and allows them to browse through any folder structures housed on the camera and then I want to allow them to select a file to be viewed in their default photo viewing application on their computer.

When the camera is disconnected, I want to shut down the application.

Setting up the AIR 2.0 Application

While I could use a number of different technologies to build our AIR application, I am going to use Adobe Flash Builder 4.   The minimum required version for a UcompOS AIR application is AIR 2.0.  You can learn more about AIR 2.0 and access its run-time and SDK at http://labs.adobe.com/technologies/air2/.

The first step is to set up a Flash Builder project for my AIR application.

My project is called Camera_Example.  Pictured at left is the fully expanded project in Flash Builder with all its files. flash_builder_project

Our main class in our AIR application is Camera_Example.mxml.

Notice in my libs folder is the file UcompOSAIRSDK.swc.  This is the UcompOS SDK file for AIR applications.  This file is found in the UcompOS Developers Package in the sdk/air folder that is created when you unzip the UcompOSSDK.zip file contained in the package.

Simply drag and drop that file into the libs folder of any Flash Builder (or Flex) based UcompOS AIR application.

You can also incorporate the UcompOS AIR SDK into Flash-based and HTML-based AIR applications (the SDK has no Flex dependencies) but the techniques for doing so are outside the scope of this tutorial.

Ideally, my goal is for the end user to not even have any knowledge that an AIR application is involved other than the initial install process.  I want the user to operate entirely within the web browser here and my rationale for this in this tutorial is with the goal in mind of showing how multiple technologies are fusing together to create a seamless rich experience.

Of course, AIR needs to be involved because AIR is what we use to do most of the heavy lifting in our application including detecting the camera attachment/detachment, browsing through the camera’s contents, and opening individual pictures on the desktop.

From an implementation point of view, an AIR application can only be launched from the web browser following a user-initiated event such as a mouse click.

When an AIR application is configured as the base source code for a UcompOS Application, and this application appears on the UcompOS Application Dock, when the user clicks the icon in the application dock, that user event is what triggers the launching of the AIR application.

I’ll add that it is possible to implement UcompOS AIR sub-applications and the best practice for doing this is to leverage the UcompOSArtifactProxy class.  This topic will be covered in a future tutorial in the near future.

Our AIR Application’s Descriptor File

Our Camera_Example-app.xml file needs a very crucial adjustment.

By default, you’ll see this XML element commented out:

<!-- <allowBrowserInvocation></allowBrowserInvocation> -->

This needs to be uncommented and issued a true value:

<allowBrowserInvocation>true</allowBrowserInvocation>

This tells the AIR runtime that your application is allowed to be launched from the web browser.

If you try to instantiate the UcompOS AIR SDK in an AIR application that does not have its descriptor set up in this manner, you’ll get a compile-time error and you won’t be able to package your application.

cameraEven though we do want our AIR application to be as innocuous as possible, if a user does stumble upon it on their main OS’ dock or in the folder on their computer where it’s been installed, I want them to see the custom icon at left and this icon and other varieties in different sizes are in the assets_embed/png folder.

Therefore in my app-descriptor file, I have implemented the following:

<icon>
 <image16x16>assets_embed/png/image16x16.png</image16x16>
 <image32x32>assets_embed/png/image32x32.png</image32x32>
 <image48x48>assets_embed/png/image48x48.png</image48x48>
 <image128x128>assets_embed/png/image128x128.png</image128x128>
 </icon>

AIR Application Code

Since I want the user to know as little as possible, if anything, about the presence of the AIR application, I want it to be invisible.  Therefore, I’ll give the visible property in the root WindowedApplication tag a value of false.  This will suppress any windows from being displayed.

Next, I want to instantiate the UcompOS SDK.

This should happen once the main application dispatches its applicationComplete event.

My root MXML tag looks like this:

<s:WindowedApplication xmlns:fx="http://ns.adobe.com/mxml/2009"
   xmlns:s="library://ns.adobe.com/flex/spark"
   xmlns:mx="library://ns.adobe.com/flex/halo"
   applicationComplete="start();"
 visible="false">

Now let’s take a look at the private variables I am declaring in my main class.  We’ll cover the purpose of each of these variables further in the tutorial:

private static var _cameraRoot:String;
private var _h:UcompOSHTMLProxy;
private var _d:UcompOSDockProxy;

Now let’s take a look at my start(); method:

private function start():void
{
 AIRSDKClient.getInstance(this,new ServicesDictionary());
 AIRSDKClient.getInstance().addEventListener(SDKClient.SDK_READY,ucompos_init);
 implementStorageVolumeListeners();
}

The instantiation of the UcompOS AIR SDK is very similar to the instantiation of the UcompOS Flex/Flash SDK that targets browser-based content with a few key exceptions:

  • The Singleton class AIRSDKClient is leveraged versus the SDKClient class
  • We pass this as the first parameter to the getInstance(); method and an optional Services Dictionary as the second parameter.  We’ll look at the Services Dictionary for this application below.
  • Internal to the AIRSDKClient class, the SDKClient class is instantiated.  Once it is instantiated, it dispatches an Event of type SDKClient.SDK_READY and only then can you safely instantiate and use any of the Proxy Components built into the SDK so you must listen for this event and implement any Proxy Component-related startup code in the event handler for this event

In our start(); method, we have a call to implementStorageVolumeListeners();

Let’s take a look at the implementStorageVolumeListeners(); method:

private function implementStorageVolumeListeners():void
{
 StorageVolumeInfo.storageVolumeInfo.addEventListener(StorageVolumeChangeEvent.STORAGE_VOLUME_MOUNT,mountHandler);
 StorageVolumeInfo.storageVolumeInfo.addEventListener(StorageVolumeChangeEvent.STORAGE_VOLUME_UNMOUNT,unmountHandler);
}

This method leverages AIR 2.0 capabilities.  StorageVolumeInfo is a Singleton class in AIR 2.0 that can have an event listener attached to it to handle StorageVolumeChangeEvent.STORAGE_VOLUME_MOUNT and StorageVolumeChangeEvent.STORAGE_VOLUME_UNMOUNT events.  These events are dispatched whenever a new mount point is introduced to the base Operating System or whenever a mount point is removed.  Our handlers for these events are mountHandler(); and unmountHandler(); respectively.

Before we take a look at mountHandler(); and unmountHandler();, let’s take a look at the ucompos_init(); method that is invoked once our UcompOS AIR SDK has been fully initialized and we are ready to interact with it fully:

private function ucompos_init(event:Event):void
 {
  _h = new UcompOSHTMLProxy();
  _h.alert("Please connect your digital camera to your computer");
  _d = UcompOSDockProxy.getInstance();
 }

In this method, we are creating an instance of UcompOSHTMLProxy.  This class has a number of methods that let us execute common JavaScript methods such as alert();, prompt();, and confirm(); in the UcompOS Portal’s HTML wrapper file.

I am choosing to use a regular JavaScript alert to prompt the user to connect their digital camera to their computer.

I am also going to create a reference to the UcompOSDockProxy Singleton and my reasons for doing this will become clear below.

Now, let’s take a look at the mountHandler(); method.

private function mountHandler(event:StorageVolumeChangeEvent):void
{
 _d.setAlert(true);
 _cameraRoot = event.rootDirectory.nativePath;
 w = new UcompOSWindowProxy();
 w.add("http://desktop.ucompass.com/Camera_Example/Camera_Browser.html",event.rootDirectory.name,400,400);
 var object:Object = API.getFiles({});
 }

This method is invoked when the user attaches a new storage volume to their computer.  It is worth mentioning at this time that the simple example being developed here could be used to browse any type of removable storage.  We just happen to be focusing on a scenario that would involve a digital camera.

The implementation details of mountHandler(); are straightforward.  First, we want to call the setAlert(); method of the UcompOSDockProxy instance and pass a value of true to it.  This makes the icon associated with this application on the UcompOS Portal Application Dock “Chirp” and glow drawing the user’s attention to it.

Then, we want to set the _cameraRoot property to event.rootDirectory.nativePath.  The StorageVolumeChangeEvent contains a rootDirectory property which is of type File and represents the file location on the file system where the base of the mount point is located.

Next we create an instance of UcompOSWindowProxy of 400 x 400 and load our HTML sub-application into it.  Our HTML sub-application will be the actual camera browser that the end user interacts with and we’ll review that later.

Our unmountHandler(); method is extremely simple:

private function unmountHandler(event:StorageVolumeChangeEvent):void
{
 w.close();
 UcompOSGlobalManagerProxy.getInstance().quitApplication();
}

This calls the close(); method on our UcompOSWindowProxy instance and then quits out of the application once the camera is removed.

Way back when we instantiated the UcompOS AIR SDK, we passed a new instance of ServicesDictionary to the instantiation method.

There are two public API methods we need our AIR application to sponsor and we are calling them Camera.getFiles and Camera.openFile.

Camera.getFiles will take the path to a given folder on the file system and return a list of the contents of that folder.

Camera.openFile will take the path to a given file on the file system and open it up with the application on the computer that the file is associated with.

First, let’s take a look at our ServicesDictionary:

package cameraexample
{
  import com.ucompass.ucompos.sdk.server.AbstractServicesDictionary;
  public class ServicesDictionary extends AbstractServicesDictionary
  {
    public function ServicesDictionary()
    {
      _map =
      {
        'Camera.getFiles':
        {
          static:true,
          classRef:API,
          method:'getFiles',
          description:'Lists files in a folder'
        },
 
        'Camera.openFile':
        {
          static:true,
          classRef:API,
          method:'openFile',
          description:'Opens a file in its native application'
        }
      }
    }
  }
}

As you can see, both of our public API methods are housed as static methods in an API class.

Here is the method that corresponds to the Camera.getFiles public API method:

public static function getFiles(data:Object):Object
{
  var folder:String = data.folder;
  if(!folder)
  {
    folder = Camera_Example.cameraRoot;
  }
 
  var file:File = new File(folder);
  var files:Array = [];
 
  for(var i:uint = 0;i<file.getDirectoryListing().length;i++)
  {
    var _file:File = file.getDirectoryListing()[i] as File;
    files.push({name:_file.name,isDirectory:_file.isDirectory});
  }
 
  return {eventType:"files",files:files,folder:folder};
 
}

The Camera.getFiles public API method expects a folder property to be on the Object parameter passed to the method.  If it’s not, it retrieves the contents at the base of the camera.

Back in our base application, we have a static getter function that retrieves the value of cameraRoot (which is why we established the value of _cameraRoot in the mountHandler(); method).

Our method simply builds an Array of Objects each having a name property and a Boolean to indicate if the item is a directory.

In our return Object, we return the eventType property set to files as well as our Array of files and a reference to the folder whose contents were retrieved.  We’ll learn more about the purpose of this eventType property when we look at our HTML sub-application.

Our public API method Camera.openFile is extremely simple:

public static function openFile(data:Object):Object
{
 var file:File = new File(data.file);
 file.openWithDefaultApplication();
 return {};
}

That’s it for our AIR application.  We are ready to package it with adt or the compiler built into Flash Builder.

I am packaging it into a file named Camera_Example.air and it will be reachable at a network URL of http://desktop.ucompass.com/Camera_Example/Camera_Example.air

Our HTML Sub-Application

Now we are ready to build our HTML sub-application which will be the interface the end-user actually interacts with.

The URL of our application will be at http://desktop.ucompass.com/Camera_Example/Camera_Browser.html.  This is the URL passed to the add(); method of our UcompOSWindowProxy instance of our mountHandler(); method in our AIR application.

We want this application to be extremely simple.

We just want it to list out the contents of our digital camera and present them as files or folders.

When the user clicks on a folder resource, we want to display the items in that folder.  When they click on a file resource, we want to open that file in the application that the file is associated with on their computer.

From an implementation point of view, when we click a folder, we are going to call our AIR application’s public API method Camera.getFiles and when we click a file we are going to call Camera.openFile.

The first thing we are going to do in our HTML sub-application is implement the UcompOS JavaScript SDK:

<script type="text/javascript" src="/UcompOSSDK.js"></script>

While it is not a requirement, best practice recommends you place the UcompOS JavaScript SDK and SWF files in the root directory of your webserver.

Here are two variables we initialize:

var camera;
var d;

When the UcompOS JavaScript SDK has initialized, it looks for a start(); method in the application its implemented into.

Our start(); method is as follows:

function start()
 {
   d = new UcompOSDockProxy();
   camera = new Camera();
   camera.addEventListener("files",filesHandler);
   camera.getFiles();
 }

We are creating an instance of UcompOSDockProxy which we’ll use to suspend the Dock alert we set in our AIR application.

More importantly, we are creating an instance of Camera, and adding an event listener to it and calling its getFiles(); method.

Camera is a Proxy Component we have built in our HTML sub-application.  A Proxy Component is an interface to the public API methods located in other entities.

In our case, the Proxy Component Camera in our sub-application is the interface to the Camera.getFiles and Camera.openFile public API methods sponsored by our AIR application.

Let’s take a look at our Proxy Component Camera and walk through it as the mechanics of Proxy Components are very important to understand:

function Camera()
{
  this.setDestination(parentConnectionId);
  this.getFiles = function(folder)
  {
    this.call("Camera.getFiles",{folder:folder});
  }
 
  this.openFile = function(file)
  {
    this.call("Camera.openFile",{file:file});
  }
}
 
Camera.prototype = new AbstractProxyComponent();
Camera.prototype.constructor = Camera;

The last two lines of the class would be analogous to saying Camera extends AbstractProxyComponent in ActionScript 3.0.  Any Proxy Component must extend AbstractProxyComponent (in ActionScript as well as JavaScript).

In our class implementation, we pass the parentConnectionId property to the setDestination method of our class (which is a method inherited from AbstractProxyComponent).

Since our sub-application was launched by our AIR application, in the context of the UcompOS Continuum, we know that our AIR application is the parent of the sub-application in scope and we can safely use the UcompOS JavaScript SDK global variable parentConnectionId (this is analogous to the public property SDKModel.getInstance().parent in the UcompOS AIR/Flash/Flex SDK).

Our Camera class also implements two methods: getFiles(); and openFile();.  As you can see by referring to the class code, both of these call the public API methods in our AIR application Camera.getFiles and Camera.openFile by using the call(); method in our class that is inherited from AbstractProxyComponent.

Another very important point, in our start(); method, refer again to this command:

camera.addEventListener("files",filesHandler);

This tells our instance of our Camera class to pass any SDKEvent’s of type “files” to the method filesHandler.

If you refer to our AIR application public API method Camera.getFiles, you’ll recall its return Object sets an eventType property to “files“.

The return Object of the public API method Camera.getFiles is passed to our filesHandler(); method.

Here is the code of our filesHandler(); method:

function filesHandler(data)
{
  var e = document.getElementById('files');
  e.innerHTML = '<p><a href="javascript:void(0);" onclick="getFiles();">Camera Root</a><p/><hr/><p/><u>Current folder: '+data.folder+'</u>';
  for(var i = 0;i<data.files.length;i++)
  {
    if(data.files[i].isDirectory)
    {
      e.innerHTML+='<p/><img src="icons/folder.gif"/> <a href="javascript:void(0);" onclick="getFiles(\''+data.folder+'/'+data.files[i].name+'\');">'+data.files[i].name+'</a>';
    }
    else
    {
      e.innerHTML+='<p/><img src="icons/file.gif"/> <a href="javascript:void(0);" onclick="openFile(\''+data.folder+'/'+data.files[i].name+'\');">'+data.files[i].name+'</a>';
    }
  }
}

Notice we are referencing the files and folder properties of the Object passed to filesHandler();.  We iterate on the files property which we know from our inspection of our AIR application’s public API method Camera.getFiles is an Array and we further know that each Object in this Array has a name:String and isDirectory:Boolean property.

We create simple HTML that displays the name of the files and folders with the appropriate icons and calls the methods getFiles(); for folders and openFile(); for files.

These methods appear below:

function getFiles(folder)
{
 d.setAlert(false);
 camera.getFiles(folder);
}
 
function openFile(file)
{
 camera.openFile(file);
}

In getFiles(); as well as openFile();, notice we are calling the setAlert(); method of the UcompOSDockProxy and passing it a value of false.  This is to cancel the Dock alert we set on the UcompOS Portal’s Application Dock that we set in the AIR application the first time the user clicks on a resource.

That’s all there is to our HTML sub-application.

Configuring Everything as a UcompOS Application

Now we need to set up our application manifest for our simple Digital Camera browser application.

This should be very straightforward if you’ve reviewed some of my other UcompOS tutorials but for AIR applications, there are some special configurations you need to make:

<application>
  <source>
    <base>http://desktop.ucompass.com/Camera_Example/Camera_Example.air</base>
    <params>
      <param>
        <name>appId</name>
        <value>Camera-Example</value>
      </param>
      <param>
        <name>publisherId</name>
        <value>0E5CA255707A7E3F70F12D38B16B8D2A4C17413C.1</value>
      </param>
    </params>
  </source>
  <titles>
    <title locale="en_US" default="true">My Camera</title>
  </titles>
  <icons>
    <icon locale="en_US" default="true">http://desktop.ucompass.com/Camera_Example/icons/camera.png</icon>
  </icons>
</application>

Notice the appId and publisherId parameters you must include in the <params/> element of the manifest.

IMPORTANT: At the time I am authoring this tutorial, the evening of December 27, 2009, the publisherId field faces an uncertain future in AIR 2.0 and may be deprecated.  At present, you can find your publisherId by looking in the $APP/Contents/Resources/META-INF/AIR/publisherid file in the application installation directory for your installed application.  The appId and publisherId parameters must be included otherwise, the UcompOS Portal will not be able to successfully launch your UcompOS AIR application.  Any changes to the AIR 2.0 implementation specifics for publisherId will be blogged about here and updates will immediately be made to the UcompOS RPF accordingly.

Next we’ll take a very quick peak at my Dock Manifest:

<applications>
  <application>
    http://desktop.ucompass.com/Camera_Example/manifest.xml
  </application>
</applications>

In this case, I obviously just have a single application I am loading into my UcompOS Portal implementation that is our simple Digital Camera browser example.

Screenshot of the Application

demo

Conclusion

In this tutorial, we created a deliberately simple application to demonstrate a number of core UcompOS RPF concepts and principles – particularly integrating the desktop into a UcompOS Rich Portal Application implementation.